Cyberbullying Revenge Porn or Harassment Question? Get Answers

Cyberbullying Revenge Porn or Harassment Question

Do you have a cyberbullying revenge porn or harassment question? Do you have a burning question about cyber-harassment or related issues you need answered by an expert? Are you looking for practical advice on how to handle an issue involving online abuse?

We will be launching our video blog soon. So send us your question – and attorney Candice Blain will answer it.

Naturally, we would never divulge your identity.  (But we will discretely notify you when an answer to your question is posted.)

If you have a question – send it to us now. Use our online contact form.

Revenge Porn is a Crime in Georgia

Revenge porn is a crime in Georgia – it is illegal.

O.C.G.A. § 16-11-90 states:

(1) Electronically transmits or posts, in one or more transmissions or posts, a photograph or video which depicts nudity or sexually explicit conduct of an adult when the transmission or post is harassment or causes financial loss to the depicted person and serves no legitimate purpose to the depicted person; or

(2) Causes the electronic transmission or posting, in one or more transmissions or posts, of a photograph or video which depicts nudity or sexually explicit conduct of an adult when the transmission or post is harassment or causes financial loss to the depicted person and serves no legitimate purpose to the depicted person.

Whether you directly do it yourself – or cause it to be done to another person – it is a crime.

Revenge porn is a crime

Sharing intimate images of another person is a misdemeanor the first time.  Do it again, and it becomes a felony.

It is a crime in Georgia.  If you violate this law you can be arrested and fingerprinted.

Workplace Inequality and Injustice – TIME’S UP

Workplace inequality

Our law firm has joined TIME’S UP in their fight against workplace inequality and injustice by becoming a member of The National Women’s Law Center’s Legal Network for Gender Equity.

Legal Network for Gender Equity fights Workplace InequalityTIME'S UP on workplace inequality and injustice

TIME’S UP is a unified call for change from women in entertainment for women everywhere.

From movie sets to farm fields to boardrooms alike, we envision nationwide leadership that reflects the world in which we live.

Powered by women, TIME’S UP addresses the systemic inequality and injustice in the workplace that have kept underrepresented groups from reaching their full potential.

Learn more about the TIME’S UP project and mission.


TIME’S UP Legal Defense Fund Helps Fight Workplace Inequality

In addition to providing online information and resources, TIME’S UP has set up a legal defense fund to aid in the fight against workplace inequality and injustice.

TIME’S UP Legal Defense Fund wiill subsidize legal support for individuals who have experienced sexual harassment or related retaliation in the workplace.

The Fund is housed at and administered by the National Women’s Law Center, an established, national women’s rights legal organization.

A network of lawyers and public relations professionals across the country will work with the Center’s Legal Network for Gender Equity to provide assistance to those who have experienced harassment or retaliation.

Access to prompt and comprehensive legal and communications help will mean empowerment for these individuals and long-term growth for our culture and communities as a whole.

Legal Representation for Workplace Inequality and Injustice

Our law firm specializes in helping victims, including victims of workplace discrimination, retaliation, and harassment.

Workplace sexual harassment is unlawful in all states under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a federal law which prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender.  (It also prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of other protected traits, such as a person’s race, national origin, or religion.)

Under this and other sexual harassment laws, an employer is said to have discriminated when an employee is subjected to severe or pervasive harassment at work on the basis of sex.

If you are a victim of workplace discrimination, harassment, retaliation, inequality, or injustice, we may be able to help.

Contact us now.

Blain | Online Forum & Community

Discuss issues relating to current gender-related and social justice issues, such as workplace sexual harassment, cyber abuse, and sexual assault & rape at our online forum & community.


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Sexual Harassment Laws

sexual harassment laws

Sexual Harassment Laws

Workplace sexual harassment is unlawful in all states under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, a federal law which prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender.  (It also prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of other protected traits, such as a person’s race, national origin, or religion.)  Under this and other sexual harassment laws, an employer is said to have discriminated when an employee is subjected to severe or pervasive harassment at work on the basis of sex.

Gender Discrimination

Sexual harassment is considered a type of discrimination because it fundamentally changes the terms and conditions of person’s employment — a change that would not have occurred had the employee been of a different gender.

But, just because sexual harassment is a type of discrimination does not mean a victim has to prove co-workers of the same gender were treated the same way.

Even if the victim was the only one subjected to harassment because of his/her gender, that is enough.

And, along the same lines, a person can be sexually harassed by a person of the same gender.

Just because the harasser and victim are of the same gender, does not mean that it was not sexual harassment.

What matters is whether the mistreatment was related to the victim’s gender.  If so, then it is prohibited by sexual harassment laws.

What It Looks Like

Sexual harassment at work can take many forms.  The ways in which a person can be victimized is limited only by a perpetrator’s imagination.

That being said, when it shows up in the workplace, sexual harassment frequently appears in one of two common forms: hostile environment and quid pro quo.

Hostile Work Environment

Hostile environment harassment is objectively offensive behavior directed at the victim that is repeatedly inflicted over time or that is severe enough to interfere with the victim’s employment.  An example of this would be a manager repeatedly making lewd or sexually-suggestive remarks to the employee for months — or engaging in nonconsensual sexual contact with her.

These incidents could be so pervasive or severe as to interfere with the employee’s work, and would therefore be considered unlawful.

Quid-Pro-Quo

Another kind of sexual harassment that often arises in the workplace is quid-pro-quo harassment.

This is when a perpetrator conditions benefits on the victim’s willingness to comply with certain demands.  These demands may be made explicit or merely implied.

Because the perpetrator altered the terms and conditions of employment in a way that is connected to the victim’s gender, this conduct is unlawful.

Preventing It

To prevent sexual harassment in the workplace, employers must first make sure that their employees understand exactly what sexual harassment may look like.

Cultural and social differences affect individuals’ perceptions of what may or may not constitute offensive or harmful conduct.

For instance, a manager may believe he is harmlessly joking around with a subordinate.  But he may actually be inflicting tremendous suffering on an employee who believes that her continued employment depends on her willingness to engage in interactions with him that cause her great discomfort.

To prevent this, employers should first — as part of their on-boarding and routinely thereafter — provide their employees interactive and engaging education on the potential impact on others of certain types of behaviors at work.

Victim Guilt and Shame

A frequently overlooked element in understanding victims’ responses to sexual harassment is the role of guilt. Sexual harassment victims commonly battle self-blame and shame before coming forward.

This may be due, at least in part, to people’s natural tendency to believe that if something bad is happening only to them, then they themselves must have done something to bring it about—or they must be defective in some way.

When victims feel alone in their experiences, they believe the problem is them.

Live and Work in Freedom From Sexual Harassment

If you are a victim, under sexual harassment laws, you are entitled to have your employer put a stop to ongoing harassment.  You are also entitled to have your employer correct work-related negative effects of harassment.

If you believe your employer is not acting to put a stop to harassment or if you believe your employer has retaliated against you because you complained of harassment, you should immediately contact a sexual harassment attorney.

Sexual harassment laws

 

Cyberbullying Victims More Often Female

cyberbullying victims

Cyberbullying victims are more often female.  And the disparity in cyberbully rates due to gender is significant.

Cyberbullying Victims – Risk Factors

According to a recently published article, “How Dangerous is Cyberbullying?,” girls are 2.6 times more likely to be cyberbullied than boys.

The article also reports that women are victims of cyber harassment at twice the rate of men, with 53% of women reporting they had previously received unwanted sexually explicit images.

Cyberbullying and cyber harassment involve intimidating or embarrassing a victim through methods such as:

Doxxing

The victim’s personally identifying details are published online.

Imping

The victim is impersonated online.

Happy slapping

Damaging or embarrassing photos or videos are published online.

Cyberbullying is considered an increasingly significant public health problem.

Victims of cyberbullying may suffer serious negative social, mental, and physical effects as a result—including increased rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide.

Various states have enacted criminal laws prohibiting cyberbullying.  Cyberbullying and cyber harassment may also be fought through civil litigation.

An experienced lawyer can help you explore and evaluate your legal options to help stop cyberbullying.

Read more: Attorney Candice Blain Offers Expertise in Spin magazine